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Dartmouth Strategic Planning

Leading Voices in Higher Education: Freeman Hrabowski

Photo Courtesy: Howard Korn

"INNOVATION, INCLUSIVE EXCELLENCE, AND LEADERSHIP: THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION"

Named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World for 2012, Freeman A. Hrabowski III has written numerous articles and co-authored two books focusing on parenting and high-achieving African Americans in science. Dr. Hrabowski has served as President of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County) since 1992. His research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance. He chaired the National Academies’ committee that produced the recent report, Expanding Underrepresented Minority Participation: America’s Science and Technology Talent at the Crossroads. He also was recently named by President Obama to chair the newly created President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. Hrabowski was a child-leader in the Civil Rights Movement and received his PhD from the University of Illinois at the age of 24. Freeman Hrabowski spoke at Dartmouth on Tuesday, October 23rd 4:00 PM in Filene Auditorium, Moore Hall.

Watch the Dartmouth Now interview with President Hrabowski »

Watch President Hrabowski's Lecture at Dartmouth »

Read more about President Hrabowski »

Watch the 60 Minutes interview with President Hrabowski »

UMBC

As President of UMBC, Dr. Hrabowski is credited with leading the university to national prestige. The Meyerhoff Scholars Program, which he co-founded in 1988, is a national model for advancing underrepresented minorities in research careers in science and engineering. UMBC is now one of the nation's leading sources of African-American Ph.D.s in science and engineering, and almost half of its seniors go immediately to grad school.  Recently, UMBC was named America’s #1 “Up-and-Coming” national university for the second year in a row by U.S. News and World Report.

View the UMBC website »